Quick Pickles – Quickles Recipe

My Nana was the first person I saw make quickles. I remember one day she had set out a platter of vegetables for a Summer Salad and she’d made some quick pickles with some button mushrooms on one side, cucumber on the other, and finally onions. My Grandfather was a divil for the pickles and strong flavours. He loved pickles and fresh peppery scallions with his salad for tea and Nana loved to make people happy with her food.

It’s only now I can appreciate how economical quick pickles are. Whatever you don’t eat is perfectly preserved and can be eaten over successive days cold from the fridge. I love my pickled vegetables with a crunch so this is the ideal burger topping I think. The secret to perfectly melty cheese on top of a burger (by the way) is to put the slices of cheese on top of the burger then cover the pan or grill for 1 minute before serving.

Here’s another simple video so you can see how simple they are to make and enjoy, messing optional…

Quick Pickles - Quickles

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 small red onion
  • ½ cucumber
  • 50ml white vinegar (or any pale vinegar of your choice)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspon ground peppercorns

Method

Slice the cucumber thinly.

Peel and slice the onion.

Layer the onion and cucumber in a large bowl. Add the vinegar, sea salt, sugar, and peppercorns and stir well. Cover the bowl with cling film and place in the fridge for an hour before serving.

To increase the pickle flavour, leave the cucumber and onion in the fridge for up to 2 days.

4 thoughts on “Quick Pickles – Quickles Recipe

  1. One of those childhood regulars – and at least part of the answer to a question asked today by A Year in Redwood. Or you could pack your vegetables tightly into a jar and pour enough of the pickle over them to cover them, using half vinegar and half water, and they’ll keep in the fridge for weeks. Just spent the afternoon pickling a cucumber glut, some as refrigerator pickles and some fermented. Mandolin cut them a little bit thinner than I wanted so I had to slice by hand – and slice, and slice and slice. Finished with a flourish by putting nasturtium seeds into a fermenting jar. Treated myself to some little fermentation locks that fit on ordinary narrow topped kilner jars. Great for pickles and kefir and such.

    1. I must mention that to Margaret so! Oh I love the nasturtium seeds pickled. I just don’t have the space here at all. Going to need a bigger house if I continue at this rate!

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